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WILL PENSWICK: DANK VERSE

StraightUp Productions

Comedy

Venue:The Place, 34-38 York Place Edinburgh EH1 3HU
Phone: 0131 556 7575
Links: Click Here for venue details, Click here for map
Ticket Prices: Free  
Room: Room
AUG 2-16 at 16:15 (60 min)
 
Show Image

He’s the world’s worst poet...and he doesn't know it.

Sex, death, Christianity, Tim Henman, pigeons, divorce, Nazism, casseroles; no topic is too out there for Will Penswick. Brought to you by one of the most enigmatic figures in modern literature, Dank Verse is a mixture of shocking (in both senses of the word; it’s awful) spoken word poetry, audience interaction,'Haiku corner' and Penswick's views on life, love and more often than not, himself. Voice of a generation? Umm...

"Laugh out loud funny"
★★★★ - Broadway Baby

“This is a seriously funny show and he is a very sharp performer...you will be in for a comic treat”
★★★★ - Plays To See

Imagine the worst poetry you’ve ever heard. Then multiply that by 1000 and give it to an artist who believes it’s perfect. Dank Verse asks you to forget everything you’ve ever known about art as Will Penswick tries to present an hour of his “best loved” work. A maverick, a renegade and a terrible flirt, Penswick’s canon demands attention, and now that he’s finally got it who knows what he might read. Laugh with him, laugh at him but either way...you’re very welcome.


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News and Reviews for this Show

May 31, 2018  Broadway Baby
Will Penswick: Dank Verse
he premise for Will Penswicks’ show is simple. Imagine the world’s most deluded poet, no doubt encouraged by his well meaning Granny, and a car wreck candidate at a Britain’s Got Talent audition and give them their own show. It works and it works well.

Laugh out loud funny

Will is already on stage as the room fills, apparently asleep. Audience interaction is almost instantaneous as he wakes up and ineptly propositions an attendee. Words tumble headlong from Will’s mouth. Obliquely connected, rhymes contrived and convoluted, the subjects bizarre, but the nonsense poems created are clever and humorous. But it’s the interruptions that bring the performance together. He creates a running commentary to his own show. A device that shows his character’s conceit, halting the poems stuttering flow to clarify or merely regroup before plunging back in. It could easily be tedious but we are seduced. We are invited to laugh with him and at him at the same time. It’s embarrassment humour without the cringe - no need to peek through fingertips. He interacts with almost everyone in the room (ok, not that hard today) as the blazing Bank Holiday weather has discouraged the masses, there are less than a dozen of us. When any of us are put in the spotlight a gentle teasing ensues, quickly turned around, with a shrug or a snort, to once again make himself the butt of the joke.

The poetry is the theme that gives the performance its raison d’etre but it’s the intrusions of his commentary, of audience participation and a series of highly contrived one-liners of dubious wit and wisdom that draw laughs and groans from us all. The topics for abuse centre on himself, an imaginary dissolute Tim Henman and the recent royal wedding. Many of the poems have a recurring theme. To me these mini tag lines feel like the leverage of the first successful joke at a relaxed dinner party which is returned to throughout the evening - it invites everyone to be an insider as well as being in on the joke. It’s intimate, we are no longer an audience but a gang. The treatment of these themes is so outlandish that no one could take offence, even Tim and the royal couple.

This is a lovely gentle show. The only jarring note is the unnecessary love hate relationship with a French maitre d’ penguin, not quite as bizarre as it’s sounds in the context of Will’s universe. Laugh out loud funny with many pleasing whimpers of approval throughout. Keep listening to all the encouragement of well meaning friends and relatives. Will has Got Talent. Click Here

March 26, 2018  Plays To See
Dank Verse
Will Penswick bills himself as the worst performance poet in the world. Don’t believe him – this is a seriously funny show and he is a very sharp performer. As we enter the theatre, Penswick is already on stage, perched on a stool, looking worried – perhaps this is explained by the Newcastle Northern Rock football shirt he is wearing under his jacket. He begins with a classic bit of “haven’t we met somewhere before” flirting with a young woman in the front row who he returns to flirt with a couple of times later in the show. He then launches into the heart of his performance which is structured around a series of poems, some of them absurd and rambling, some of them very clever, all incorporating word play that deserves a second hearing. And the witty way the poems are linked completes the package.

He has some themes that he returns to – one of them being an unhealthy interest in the love lives of Tim Henman and Maria Sharapova. He has a very funny poem about inter-railing with some caustic comments about the cities he visited. He even manages to incorporate some sideways swipes at Harry and Meghan. And whenever his ego threatens to get the better of him, he always finds a way to puncture his own bubble. One of his most endearing qualities is the way he relates to the members of the audience he draws into his world – if he offers you a bell to ring, you should definitely take it.

The programme blurb tells us that Dank Verse is the result of Will playing around with silly poems that he has been writing since graduating from Trinity College, Dublin and performing around the London comedy scene. It also tells us that the show will be moving on to Brighton and Edinburgh – if you can see it at either of those festivals you will be in for a comic treat. Click Here

March 26, 2018 Plays To See
Dank Verse
Will Penswick bills himself as the worst performance poet in the world. Don’t believe him – this is a seriously funny show and he is a very sharp performer. As we enter the theatre, Penswick is already on stage, perched on a stool, looking worried – perhaps this is explained by the Newcastle Northern Rock football shirt he is wearing under his jacket. He begins with a classic bit of “haven’t we met somewhere before” flirting with a young woman in the front row who he returns to flirt with a couple of times later in the show. He then launches into the heart of his performance which is structured around a series of poems, some of them absurd and rambling, some of them very clever, all incorporating word play that deserves a second hearing. And the witty way the poems are linked completes the package.

He has some themes that he returns to – one of them being an unhealthy interest in the love lives of Tim Henman and Maria Sharapova. He has a very funny poem about inter-railing with some caustic comments about the cities he visited. He even manages to incorporate some sideways swipes at Harry and Meghan. And whenever his ego threatens to get the better of him, he always finds a way to puncture his own bubble. One of his most endearing qualities is the way he relates to the members of the audience he draws into his world – if he offers you a bell to ring, you should definitely take it.

The programme blurb tells us that Dank Verse is the result of Will playing around with silly poems that he has been writing since graduating from Trinity College, Dublin and performing around the London comedy scene. It also tells us that the show will be moving on to Brighton and Edinburgh – if you can see it at either of those festivals you will be in for a comic treat. Click Here

March 26, 2018  Plays To See
Dank Verse
Will Penswick bills himself as the worst performance poet in the world. Don’t believe him – this is a seriously funny show and he is a very sharp performer. As we enter the theatre, Penswick is already on stage, perched on a stool, looking worried – perhaps this is explained by the Newcastle Northern Rock football shirt he is wearing under his jacket. He begins with a classic bit of “haven’t we met somewhere before” flirting with a young woman in the front row who he returns to flirt with a couple of times later in the show. He then launches into the heart of his performance which is structured around a series of poems, some of them absurd and rambling, some of them very clever, all incorporating word play that deserves a second hearing. And the witty way the poems are linked completes the package.

He has some themes that he returns to – one of them being an unhealthy interest in the love lives of Tim Henman and Maria Sharapova. He has a very funny poem about inter-railing with some caustic comments about the cities he visited. He even manages to incorporate some sideways swipes at Harry and Meghan. And whenever his ego threatens to get the better of him, he always finds a way to puncture his own bubble. One of his most endearing qualities is the way he relates to the members of the audience he draws into his world – if he offers you a bell to ring, you should definitely take it.

The programme blurb tells us that Dank Verse is the result of Will playing around with silly poems that he has been writing since graduating from Trinity College, Dublin and performing around the London comedy scene. It also tells us that the show will be moving on to Brighton and Edinburgh – if you can see it at either of those festivals you will be in for a comic treat. Click Here

March 26, 2018  Plays To See
Dank Verse
Will Penswick bills himself as the worst performance poet in the world. Don’t believe him – this is a seriously funny show and he is a very sharp performer. As we enter the theatre, Penswick is already on stage, perched on a stool, looking worried – perhaps this is explained by the Newcastle Northern Rock football shirt he is wearing under his jacket. He begins with a classic bit of “haven’t we met somewhere before” flirting with a young woman in the front row who he returns to flirt with a couple of times later in the show. He then launches into the heart of his performance which is structured around a series of poems, some of them absurd and rambling, some of them very clever, all incorporating word play that deserves a second hearing. And the witty way the poems are linked completes the package.

He has some themes that he returns to – one of them being an unhealthy interest in the love lives of Tim Henman and Maria Sharapova. He has a very funny poem about inter-railing with some caustic comments about the cities he visited. He even manages to incorporate some sideways swipes at Harry and Meghan. And whenever his ego threatens to get the better of him, he always finds a way to puncture his own bubble. One of his most endearing qualities is the way he relates to the members of the audience he draws into his world – if he offers you a bell to ring, you should definitely take it.

The programme blurb tells us that Dank Verse is the result of Will playing around with silly poems that he has been writing since graduating from Trinity College, Dublin and performing around the London comedy scene. It also tells us that the show will be moving on to Brighton and Edinburgh – if you can see it at either of those festivals you will be in for a comic treat. Click Here

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